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Maternal and Newborn Care Unit
While You Are Here - Routines

Routine for Babies

  • Healthy babies stay in the room in with their mothers 24 hours a day to encourage family bonding and make breastfeeding easier.
  • Your Primary Care Nurse will examine your baby at least once each shift to ensure that your baby is adjusting to birth appropriately. Your nurse may have to check the baby's vital signs more frequently.
  • Be alert and watch for your baby's feeding signs such as stirring, stretching, moving hands to mouth, sucking, licking, rooting, rapid eye movement and waking. Offer the breast whenever your baby shows feeding signs, and at least 8 times in 24 hours.
  • More information about breastfeeding your baby
  • Skin-to-skin contact with your baby is strongly encouraged. Skin-to-skin contact with your baby helps your baby to regulate their body temperature, feel soothed and enhances breastfeeding success.
  • Information about how to care for your baby will be provided throughout your stay. If you have any questions, feel free to ask your nurse.

Routine for Mothers

Vaginal Deliveries:

  • Your Primary Nurse will examine you at least once each shift to ensure that you are healing appropriately. Your nurse may have to check your vital signs more frequently.
  • If you have had an episiotomy or a tear when giving birth, soaking in a warm bathtub twice a day is recommended. It is okay to follow your regular showering routine after giving birth vaginally.
  • You may have an IV after giving birth. This will be removed by your nurse when you no longer require it for medications or fluids.
  • Information about how to care for your body after giving birth will be provided throughout your stay. If you have any questions, feel free to ask your nurse.

Cesarean Section Deliveries:mom and baby in pink pants5001.jpg

  • Your Primary Nurse will examine you at least once each shift to ensure that you are healing appropriately. Your nurse may have to check your vital signs more frequently.
  • Your nurse will assist you when you get out of bed for the first time after your surgery. Most of the time, this is done about 6 hours after the birth of your baby.
  • You will have an IV after having surgery. This will be removed by your nurse when you no longer require it for medications or fluids.
  • You will have a urinary catheter after having surgery. This will be removed by your nurse when you are able to get up to the toilet on your own. Most of the time, this is done about 18 hours after the birth of your baby.
  • You are advised not to shower until the second day after your surgery. This is to reduce the risk of getting an infection in your incision.
  • Tub baths are discouraged for 2 weeks after a cesarean section. Showers are recommended.
  • Information about how to care for your body after surgery and delivery will be provided throughout your stay. If you have any questions, feel free to ask your nurse.

Managing Pain after Giving Birth:

  • Your nurse can suggest a variety of ways to help you manage your pain after giving birth.
  • If you had an episiotomy or a tear when giving birth, soaking in a warm bathtub twice a day is recommended.
  • Ice packs are available for use.
  • Your doctor will prescribe medications that are safe to take while breastfeeding for the duration of your hospital stay.
  • A medication package may be given to you if your nurse determines you are an appropriate candidate for our Self-Administered Medication (SAM)​ program.
  • If you are having pain, please tell your nurse so she can keep you comfortable.
  • It is important to rest and relax to help your body heal.
Last Modified: Monday, May 15, 2017 |
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