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Jun 26
PACT to set new standard in province

Saskatoon mental health patients living in the community who find themselves in crisis are more likely to receive help from the right person at the right time through a new team with expert mental health training. The team was established by Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. The first of its kind model in Saskatchewan is being launched after Saskatoon Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services received $250,000 in funding for 2014-15 from Saskatchewan's Ministry of Health.

"This program supports the Saskatchewan Plan for Growth goal of eliminating emergency department waits by 2017," says Health Minister Dustin Duncan. "This will ensure that people are connected with the most appropriate resources." 

The Police and Crisis Team (PACT) is made up of a police officer who has received mental health training and a mental health crisis professional who will be sent to calls when their expertise is needed. Its creation is the result of a partnership between Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. These groups wanted a better way of responding to mental health and addictions issues on the street.

Saskatoon police officers respond to approximately 5,000 calls per year that involve someone experiencing a mental health crisis and initiated the creation of PACT after hearing success stories from their colleagues in Alberta.

"PACT is another example of how police, health and the community can work together," says Chief Clive Weighill, Saskatoon Police Service. "Being able to put together a police officer with specialized training with a mental health crisis counsellor will allow us to have the right people responding to these types of calls and to be more effective."

PACT will help stabilize clients in the community then link them with the appropriate services.

"The Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service is pleased with the opportunity to take another step in partnering with the Saskatoon Police Service with the support of the Saskatoon Health Region," says Rita Field, Saskatoon's Crisis Intervention Service's executive director. "PACT will enhance our collective ability to provide a proactive response to crisis situations involving mental health and addictions. We are confident that its impact will be felt on an individual as well as a systems and community level." 

The goal is to reduce arrests due to psychosocial issues, reduce unnecessary and inappropriate emergency department visits, strengthen partnerships of those serving at-risk individuals and enhance community safety through more effective crisis intervention.

"PACT is another example of how working with our partners in the community, we can improve the care for people who are in a crisis situation," says Jim Rhode, Chair Saskatoon Regional Health Authority. "It is crucial that we make sure people are getting to the right place for the right care especially in these situations."

Saskatoon mental health patients living in the community who find themselves in crisis are more likely to receive help from the right person at the right time through a new team with expert mental health training. The team established by Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. The first of its kind model in Saskatchewan is being launched after Saskatoon Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services received $250,000 in funding for 2014-15 from Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Health.
“This program supports the Saskatchewan Plan for Growth goal of eliminating emergency department
 waits by 2017,” says Health Minister Dustin Duncan. “This will ensure that people are connected with the most appropriate resources.”  
The Police and Crisis Team (PACT) is made up of a police officer who has received mental health training and a mental health crisis professional who will be sent to calls when their expertise is needed. Its creation is the result of a partnership between Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. These groups wanted a better way of responding to mental health and addictions issues on the street.
Saskatoon police officers respond to approximately 5,000 calls per year that involve someone experiencing a mental health crisis and initiated the creation of PACT after hearing success stories from their colleagues in Alberta.
“PACT is another example of how police, health and the community can work together,” says Chief Clive Weighill, Saskatoon Police Service. “Being able to put together a police officer with specialized training with a mental health crisis counsellor will allow us to have the right people responding to these types of calls and to be more effective.”
PACT will help stabilize clients in the community then link them with the appropriate services.
“The Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service is pleased with the opportunity to take another step in partnering with the Saskatoon Police Service with the support of the Saskatoon Health Region,” says Rita Field, Saskatoon’s Crisis Intervention Service’s executive director. “PACT will enhance our collective ability to provide a proactive response to crisis situations involving mental health and addictions. We are confident that its impact will be felt on an individual as well as a systems and community level.”  
The goal is to reduce arrests due to psychosocial issues, reduce unnecessary and inappropriate emergency department visits, strengthen partnerships of those serving at-risk individuals and enhance community safety through more effective crisis intervention.
“PACT is another example of how working with our partners in the community, we can improve the care for people who are in a crisis situation,” says Jim Rhode, Chair Saskatoon Regional Health Authority. “It is crucial that we make sure people are getting to the right place for the right care especially in these situations.”
Saskatoon mental health patients living in the community who find themselves in crisis are more likely to receive help from the right person at the right time through a new team with expert mental health training. The team established by Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. The first of its kind model in Saskatchewan is being launched after Saskatoon Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services received $250,000 in funding for 2014-15 from Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Health.
“This program supports the Saskatchewan Plan for Growth goal of eliminating emergency department
 waits by 2017,” says Health Minister Dustin Duncan. “This will ensure that people are connected with the most appropriate resources.”  
The Police and Crisis Team (PACT) is made up of a police officer who has received mental health training and a mental health crisis professional who will be sent to calls when their expertise is needed. Its creation is the result of a partnership between Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. These groups wanted a better way of responding to mental health and addictions issues on the street.
Saskatoon police officers respond to approximately 5,000 calls per year that involve someone experiencing a mental health crisis and initiated the creation of PACT after hearing success stories from their colleagues in Alberta.
“PACT is another example of how police, health and the community can work together,” says Chief Clive Weighill, Saskatoon Police Service. “Being able to put together a police officer with specialized training with a mental health crisis counsellor will allow us to have the right people responding to these types of calls and to be more effective.”
PACT will help stabilize clients in the community then link them with the appropriate services.
“The Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service is pleased with the opportunity to take another step in partnering with the Saskatoon Police Service with the support of the Saskatoon Health Region,” says Rita Field, Saskatoon’s Crisis Intervention Service’s executive director. “PACT will enhance our collective ability to provide a proactive response to crisis situations involving mental health and addictions. We are confident that its impact will be felt on an individual as well as a systems and community level.”  
The goal is to reduce arrests due to psychosocial issues, reduce unnecessary and inappropriate emergency department visits, strengthen partnerships of those serving at-risk individuals and enhance community safety through more effective crisis intervention.
“PACT is another example of how working with our partners in the community, we can improve the care for people who are in a crisis situation,” says Jim Rhode, Chair Saskatoon Regional Health Authority. “It is crucial that we make sure people are getting to the right place for the right care especially in these situations.”
Saskatoon mental health patients living in the community who find themselves in crisis are more likely to receive help from the right person at the right time through a new team with expert mental health training. The team established by Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. The first of its kind model in Saskatchewan is being launched after Saskatoon Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services received $250,000 in funding for 2014-15 from Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Health.
“This program supports the Saskatchewan Plan for Growth goal of eliminating emergency department
 waits by 2017,” says Health Minister Dustin Duncan. “This will ensure that people are connected with the most appropriate resources.”  
The Police and Crisis Team (PACT) is made up of a police officer who has received mental health training and a mental health crisis professional who will be sent to calls when their expertise is needed. Its creation is the result of a partnership between Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. These groups wanted a better way of responding to mental health and addictions issues on the street.
Saskatoon police officers respond to approximately 5,000 calls per year that involve someone experiencing a mental health crisis and initiated the creation of PACT after hearing success stories from their colleagues in Alberta.
“PACT is another example of how police, health and the community can work together,” says Chief Clive Weighill, Saskatoon Police Service. “Being able to put together a police officer with specialized training with a mental health crisis counsellor will allow us to have the right people responding to these types of calls and to be more effective.”
PACT will help stabilize clients in the community then link them with the appropriate services.
“The Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service is pleased with the opportunity to take another step in partnering with the Saskatoon Police Service with the support of the Saskatoon Health Region,” says Rita Field, Saskatoon’s Crisis Intervention Service’s executive director. “PACT will enhance our collective ability to provide a proactive response to crisis situations involving mental health and addictions. We are confident that its impact will be felt on an individual as well as a systems and community level.”  
The goal is to reduce arrests due to psychosocial issues, reduce unnecessary and inappropriate emergency department visits, strengthen partnerships of those serving at-risk individuals and enhance community safety through more effective crisis intervention.
“PACT is another example of how working with our partners in the community, we can improve the care for people who are in a crisis situation,” says Jim Rhode, Chair Saskatoon Regional Health Authority. “It is crucial that we make sure people are getting to the right place for the right care especially in these situations.”
Saskatoon mental health patients living in the community who find themselves in crisis are more likely to receive help from the right person at the right time through a new team with expert mental health training. The team established by Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. The first of its kind model in Saskatchewan is being launched after Saskatoon Health Region Mental Health and Addiction Services received $250,000 in funding for 2014-15 from Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Health.
“This program supports the Saskatchewan Plan for Growth goal of eliminating emergency department
 waits by 2017,” says Health Minister Dustin Duncan. “This will ensure that people are connected with the most appropriate resources.”  
The Police and Crisis Team (PACT) is made up of a police officer who has received mental health training and a mental health crisis professional who will be sent to calls when their expertise is needed. Its creation is the result of a partnership between Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon Police Service and Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service. These groups wanted a better way of responding to mental health and addictions issues on the street.
Saskatoon police officers respond to approximately 5,000 calls per year that involve someone experiencing a mental health crisis and initiated the creation of PACT after hearing success stories from their colleagues in Alberta.
“PACT is another example of how police, health and the community can work together,” says Chief Clive Weighill, Saskatoon Police Service. “Being able to put together a police officer with specialized training with a mental health crisis counsellor will allow us to have the right people responding to these types of calls and to be more effective.”
PACT will help stabilize clients in the community then link them with the appropriate services.
“The Saskatoon Crisis Intervention Service is pleased with the opportunity to take another step in partnering with the Saskatoon Police Service with the support of the Saskatoon Health Region,” says Rita Field, Saskatoon’s Crisis Intervention Service’s executive director. “PACT will enhance our collective ability to provide a proactive response to crisis situations involving mental health and addictions. We are confident that its impact will be felt on an individual as well as a systems and community level.”  
The goal is to reduce arrests due to psychosocial issues, reduce unnecessary and inappropriate emergency department visits, strengthen partnerships of those serving at-risk individuals and enhance community safety through more effective crisis intervention.
“PACT is another example of how working with our partners in the community, we can improve the care for people who are in a crisis situation,” says Jim Rhode, Chair Saskatoon Regional Health Authority. “It is crucial that we make sure people are getting to the right place for the right care especially in these situations.”

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